Allergy & Asthma Network Mothers of Asthmatics (AANMA)

‘Asthma Basics’

E-Cigarettes: What We Know … And Don’t Know

Published December - 11 - 2014

EcigElectronic cigarettes (or e-cigarettes), a $2.5 billion industry, are getting a lot of media coverage lately and e-cigarette retail shops and Internet sites are becoming more widespread. What are these products? And are they different from traditional cigarettes that are known to be dangerous to people with asthma? Read the rest of this entry »

ChenowethBroadway star Kristin Chenoweth was diagnosed with asthma in 2004. Since then, she keeps her bronchodilator inhaler always within reach, whether she’s at home or on stage. And she keeps tabs on her dose counter so she knows exactly how much medication remains in her inhaler. Read the rest of this entry »

Help For Women With Asthma

Published September - 30 - 2014

BF21Women with asthma often face extra difficulty controlling their symptoms due to fluctuating hormones, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), especially during menstruation, pregnancy and menopause. CDC says changing estrogen levels can lead to an inflammatory response, so it is important for women to know the warning signs of an attack, stay away from things that set off their symptoms, and follow the advice of their physician with regard to medication.

Read the rest of this entry »

 

BreatheFreeAllergy & Asthma Network is now recruiting participants for Women Breathe Free, an asthma education program made especially for women — with the goal of helping women everywhere gain better control over their asthma, and their lives.

The program will help women develop asthma management skills to handle situations and symptoms that can lead to an asthma flare, such as stress, menstrual cycles, not taking medications, or exposure to triggers such as cleaning chemicals, pollen, mold or dust mites.

HOW IT WORKS?

Women Breathe Free offers four telephone counseling sessions conducted by a nurse educator during times that fit into your schedule. Upon joining the program, you will receive a workbook and review it with the nurse educator to learn what causes your asthma to worsen, what helps keep it under control and how to track your symptoms.

The program also aims to assist in strengthening communication between you and your health care provider to get the most out of your asthma treatment. The goal is to help you control your asthma so you can live YOUR healthiest life possible.

Women Breathe Free is open to women 18 years or older with diagnosed asthma. It is FREE and confidential – no personal information will be collected.

WANT TO JOIN?

For more information, call Allergy & Asthma Network at 800.878.4403 or email Marcela Gieminiani, at mgieminiani@aanma.org.

Breathe Easy At Asthma Camp

Published April - 30 - 2014

AsthmaCampAsthma camps offer children the opportunity to participate in fun, summer activities — scavenger hunts, swimming, rock climbing and more – while in a medically safe environment.

Research shows that children who attend an asthma camp have better asthma control the following year, are more likely to use daily preventive medication, and are 33 percent less likely to be hospitalized.

Read the rest of this entry »


It’s no secret: Allergy and asthma families embrace solutions that offer freedom from symptoms, eliminate needless hardships and reduce wasteful spending.

 

In fact, we don’t accept bland very well. We are motivated to use whatever tools we can in order to get where we want to be when we want to be there. That’s exactly what “My Personal Allergy & Asthma Guide” delivers. Read the rest of this entry »

Ask the Allergist: Measuring Inflammation

Published January - 4 - 2013

By David M. Lang, MD

What is exhaled nitric oxide testing?

Asthma symptoms – coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath – are driven by underlying inflammation in the airways. When we want to assess a person’s asthma, we can observe symptoms and test lung function with spirometry, Read the rest of this entry »

Every Breath Tells a Story

Published October - 2 - 2012

Most of us know that the air we breathe affects our lungs. What you may not know is that the air you breathe out can tell us how.

For instance: We all exhale a little nitric oxide (NO). But too much nitric oxide is an indicator of lung inflammation, the underlying condition of asthma. Read the rest of this entry »

lung_416When the National Institutes of Health (NIH) released the new national asthma guidelines, Expert Panel Report 3: Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma (EPR-3), AANMA was excited to read that many of the Expert Panel’s recommendations echo asthma treatment concepts we’ve been supporting since 1985. Read the rest of this entry »

For years, physicians have assessed asthma by measuring how much air a patient can exhale. Now, some doctors are beginning to measure what’s in that breathed-out air – specifically, nitric oxide (NO). Scientists have discovered that the amount of nitric oxide in a patient’s breath indicates the degree of inflammation in the airways. Read the rest of this entry »